TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PROCUREMENT LAUNCHED

NETWORK RAIL has published a Periodic Indicative Notice seeking a Traffic Management Partner to work with its London North Eastern & East Midlands and London North Western Routes.

Two lots would be included, one for each Route, with the procurement exercise expected to launch in April. It runs alongside exist procurements being run by LNE&EM Route for a Train Control Partner and Railway Systems Integration Partner to deliver a Digital Railway on the southern stretch of the East Coast main line. Lot 1 for the LNE&EM Route will comprise the area controlled by York Railway Operating Centre (ROC), with an option to also include Derby ROC’s control area, while the second lot for LNW Route will cover the area controlled by Manchester ROC. The lots will meet at the Route boundary on the TransPennine route between Manchester and Leeds, requiring technical integration between the two systems.

Lot 1 is valued at between £36 and £108 million, and Lot 2 at between £36 and £72 million. NR is expecting to award a framework for an initial period of four years, with extensions in single or multiple periods up to a maximum duration of eight years.

Each framework agreement will be setup to permit call-offs on four different commercial bases. These will be ‘design build maintain’, incorporating payment on a milestone basis for: n development, licensing and implementation of TM and then for ongoing maintenance and support; n ‘managed service’, where NR pays the supplier to run and manage the service on its behalf based on performance quality; n ‘software as a service’, where NR would pay for a mix of subscription and performance-based mechanisms; and n ‘professional service contracts’, covering ad-hoc and non-solution provision services

■development, licensing and implementation of TM and then for ongoing maintenance and support;

■ ‘managed service’, where NR pays the supplier to run and manage the service on its behalf based on performance quality;

■ ‘software as a service’, where NR would pay for a mix of subscription and performance-based mechanisms; and

■ ‘professional service contracts’, covering ad-hoc and non-solution provision services.